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1921 Irish census


mishka
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People may or may not know that there was no census taken in Ireland in 1921 because of the Independence negotiations - it was actually taken in 1926 and should be coming available - BUT because of covid and also privacy issues it will not now be released until at least 2026 - and more than probable later than that.

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Here is a brief "History"..............

The first full government census of Ireland was taken in 1821 with further censuses at ten-yearly intervals from 1831 through to 1911. No census was taken in 1921, because of the War of Independence. The first census of the population of the Irish Free State was taken in 1926. The censuses from 1851 to 1911 were taken under the supervision of the Registrar General of Births, Deaths and Marriages. The 1926 and all subsequent censuses were taken under the Statistics Act, 1926. The responsibility for taking censuses was transferred from the Registrar General to the newly established Statistics Branch of the Department of Industry and Commerce. The Statistics Branch has since become the Central Statistics Office. 

To date censuses have been taken in 1926, 1936, 1946, 1951, 1956, 1961, 1966, 1971, 1979 (the census due in 1976 was cancelled as an economy measure), 1981, 1986, 1991, 1996, 2002 and 2006. The returns for 1926 - 1946 and part of those for 1951 are held in the National Archives, but they remain under the control of the Central Statistics Office, to the extent that the staff of the National Archives are not permitted to examine them for any purpose. The more recent returns are still held by the Central Statistics Office. The 1926 Census Returns will be released to public inspection in January 2027.

The original census returns for 1861 and 1871 were destroyed shortly after the censuses were taken. Those for 1881 and 1891 were pulped during the First World War, probably because of the paper shortage. The returns for 1821, 1831, 1841 and 1851 were, apart from a few survivals, notably for a few counties for 1821 and 1831, destroyed in 1922 in the fire at the Public Record Office at the beginning of the Civil War.

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My neighbour at the top of the lane (only 4 houses in my townland) Tommy Gallagher is 104.  He still  lives in the 3 room cottage he was born in - there were 7 children and the parents, 9 in all, living there and it's still the same, apart from a bathroom added onto the back.  He is sprightly still - did his own gardening until a couple of years ago, and is sharp as a tack.  I love talking to him - he's a mine of information and he's told me stories about how the kids had only 1 pair of shoes between them, and whoever had to walk a mile down our lane to the water pump (no running water at the house) wore the shoes for the journey.  He's the last surviving child of the family and remembers all his siblings and their children.  He never married - he was the one who looked after his parents - and the last time I spoke to him, a while ago now because of bloody covid, he was telling me about the early 1920's and what was going on here - he is of the firm opinion that the census of 1926 should be released asap as it will be of enormous help to local people and historians alike.  There is a local history group who have, for years, been collecting information from local families to try to fill in destroyed/missing census but again - covid has put a stop to it.  We have brilliant church records - but first find your townland and it's church - and there lies the problem as a lot of them just don't exist or are deserted.  If a property is left empty here - I mean an old property - because of emigration or death whatever it cannot be sold until the heirs are found - and trust me we have a lot of these properties just falling down in ruins now - there are 4 further down the lane here.  I wish I could learn about who they belonged to - and what happened to them.  One I do know has been empty and locked since the last days of the famine when the family went to Canada and died when they got there of disease caught on the ship but the property still stands in memory of them and is slowly falling apart.

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Reminds me of the docu-move released a couple of years ago, 'Older Than Ireland' (trailer below - though the full movie is free somewhere, just can't locate at the moment). The first woman introduced in the documentary is introduced, sits down and lights up a fag. A bloody great watch if you get the chance.

 

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On 22/12/2021 at 00:20, RATTY said:

there are still people blanked out on the 1939 even though they are well dead.

And others on it who are still alive. I noticed my Dad's cousin's details and the family home. Out of curiosity I checked and found another person with the same name and age who had died. Am presuming when the list was still used for NHS records this error occurred.

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