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Old Photographs of St.Helens


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Also from Beechams tower and I'd say that this, judging from the progress of demolition, was probably about 1973.

kingst.jpg

Bottom left, Lowe Street. with the second junction near the 'new' school being Wilson Street (leading into what became Asda). Fillingham's haulage garage bottom centre facing King Street and behind those the backs of houses in Henry Street. The old derelict Co-op dairy (with its chimney) brings back many memories.  It's scary to think that as kids we were all over that roof.

LoweStbeforedemolitionin1973Thebuil.jpg

The Duke Street (left) end of Lowe Street, with Beechams clock tower peeping over the top of the dairy offices. One of my mate's grandmother had lived in one of those houses and they were tiny. I think that she'd been paying a landlord 5/- (25p) per week to live there. From the same spot (if you could stand there now) you'd be looking at Lidl and its car park.


added 18 minutes later

lowest.jpgose 

Lowe Street again and its junction with Henry Street. A lorry coming out of Barton Street and in the distance The Rifle Corps (The Sheesh). Two women walking past the Dairy shop/offices - and I keep thinking that the kid on the corner was me, but I'm not sure.


added 46 minutes later

I think that whoever took the picture that showed our house in Hamer Street (posted by Jeff) turned around and snapped the rest of Hamer Street leading to Westfield Street and Beechams. 

hamer2.jpg

Roberts shop (I think he did furniture and stuff) was on the corner with Henry Street. I was with my mates one day and one of them (Mezzer) stuck a lit match on my neck (sulphur still in a state of ignition) and in my red-mist rage I went to kick him but missed and put a dent in someone's car. The bloke from the shop came out and I'm sure that he was going to start bollocking me, but when it became clear that I'd been a victim of malicious intent he said that if whoever owned the car inquired then he'd plead ignorance.

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Great stuff, keep em coming. I effectively left St Helens 60 years ago and apart from the odd visit to family in Harris Street, Rivington Ave and Laffak and a couple of years ago to Wardleworh's bookshop. those pics are my only memories of St Helens

Edited by Alan
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Probably in the 1950s, but seeing that car it might have even been in the 40s.

HamerStin1960-housesdatefrom1856-de.jpg

Elsie Richardson's shop on the corner of Hamer Street and North John Street (what was our house in 62/63, number 18 was next door). Elsie would have been there then. She never married and I think she lived there for most of her life. She was my regular supplier of 'lucky bags' and other sweets - sometimes for free. In the 70s that swinging sign on Loftus's betting shop (just out of view on the right) was still there and it had an eerie squeak in the wind.


added 24 minutes later

Still Hamer Street (you can see the betting shop with its sign on the left) and Beecham's clock tower in the smoggy air.

HamerStreet.jpg

Remember the pet shop on the right at the end? It had an aquarium in it, with tanks full of all sorts of exotic fish. The owners didn't mind if you just went in there to have a look at them. And it didn't half get smoggy round there in the 60s - proper pea-soupers, and you could literally get lost in the maze of streets on a bad day.

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This picture taken from the top of Lowe House tower is evocative too.

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Showing the old dairy and the rooftops of houses long gone. 

Sadly throwing in another anecdote, but that white-ish rooftop on the storage warehouse at the back of Barton's on Duke street. Some of the mates were playing cricket and some of us weren't. We'd decided to climb up on that roof and because it was strewn with pieces of bricks and other stuff we decided to interrupt the game with some fast bowling of bricks. One of the lads ruined his bat trying to deflect them back up at us and a full scale war broke out. As I bent to pick one up one got me right in the middle of the top of my head. And you know how in some daft horror films where the camera angle shot turns red with blood - it was just like that. Pumping out and covering my parker in the red stuff. So we all went off to the Prov and I was absolutely covered in it. I was stood at the front of the gang and the nurse said "Which one of you needs treatment?" Duh...

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46 minutes ago, NSSO said:

What i liked was around Christmas going round the various streets.My mum used to go on the post.Looking through the various open  doors seeing the open coal fires,trees,paper decorations.

My God, that brought some happy memories back. All those crepe paper decorations and coal fires. Christmas really meant something in those pre-TV days

Edited by Alan
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2 hours ago, Dave said:

Lowe Street. with the second junction near the 'new' school being Wilson Street (leading into what became Asda)

What's that building Dave standing alone just above the school? (On what is now Fenton Close).

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I think that it was Berry's fruit and veg and stuff like that. The bloke who owned it used to come on here, but I might be mixing the name up with something else. Not sure. When closed it became the headquarters of the Hope Street bommy gang.

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Alan yep.but there some scrooge buggers!

I went round with mum post delivery at christmas.

One big ussue was trying to get back payt needed when NO STAMP on envelope.

Some wouldnt psy and told us what we could do with the calendar esp.

Bah humbug!!

 

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A long time ago there used to be flooding around the Westfield Street area by the Eccleston Windle brook, which once upon-a-time meandered through what became Queens Recreational park and then through the streets going into town and down to the canal which became the hotties. It was probably a pain. So they decided to cover it over or culvert it.

Before

thebrook.jpg

and a long time after...

BrookCulvertStHelens19702.jpg

 People wondered why it was still called 'the brook'.


added 19 minutes later

A rite of passage for the lads in town for many years was to be enlisted (or press-ganged) into one of the brook bommy gangs. The main two surviving bommy gangs in the early 70s were the Hope Street (Hopey - or pronounced Hopeh) or Raglan Street (Rageh). With all the demolition going on our material source for the impending bommy nights was in abundance. With some decent sticks a mob of lads could remove all the doors from an old house in minutes. Proper organised, we'd pile them onto trollies and pile them all somewhere (in old house yards or somewhere suitable), but as the bommy night approached it'd get more tense and nerve-wracking, because Hopeh and Rageh would be doing their best to sabotage each others efforts - robbing from or attempting to burn each others piles. So there was guard duty - along with expeditionary exercises. Sometimes they'd join up to raid the top-grounders up near Eccleston Street.


added 31 minutes later

And when I said about how the brook 'meandered', you'll see from this 1851 map segment that I wasn't messing...

brook.png

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Thanks everyone. Great photos & maps, brings back memories of my early years, though I lived in Moss Bank/Clinkham Wood, I went to Lowe House School & all my friends lived round there, so spent a lot of time in those streets, playing etc. One friend I remember in particular was Violet Briers, we used to go to her house a lot and I still remember when those houses & streets had gas lights and the dark foggy nights in the Winter coming home from school back to near the Sefton to get the bus back home. Happy Days! :thumb:

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Dave much appreciated the 1851 map.

We have pickavances in our family tree.

The map shows Pickavances Cottage on Boundary road.

I was trying to find any further details of occupants etc. but couldnt find this map that i knew existed.

Can anyone give info to help search.

   

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I felt completely lost 2 years ago when I last visited the town. For example, take Westfield Street and Liverpool Road. My memory is that Westfield Street started just off the Cotham Hotel and Liverpool Road started by the old market. Liverpool Road was the main thoroughfare west out of town and passed Pilks old head office before being joined by Westfield Street at the start of Greenbank's Borough Road and the end of Boundary Road. Liverpool Road seems to have been downgraded in importance and maybe has been re-routed?

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1 hour ago, NSSO said:

Dave much appreciated the 1851 map.

I already posted this on another thread, but the full map is fantastic. Le200 got it from somewhere. You have to download it (it's big!) and open it in an image viewer program and then you can zoom in. It doesn't work right in the browser. 

OS5.MYCLOUD.COM

Shared with My Cloud

 

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Liverpool Rd. has been downgraded extensively. The only building of note in it is the PO sorting office at the bottom. It's a great pity because I recall my Mum taking me shopping along Liverpool Rd. when I was young. There were loads of shops in it including the Co-op stores, greengrocers, confectioners, butchers, dry cleaners, toy shops, and more pubs than I can remember. It's a street going nowhere at the moment and appears to be neglected and forgotten

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