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Greenall's fine ales

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Served many a bottle of all three when I worked at The Royal Oak (East Lancs), The Lingholme and The Gerrard Arms.  They also did a bottle of 'strong, dark ale' similar to a Barley Wine - might have been called 'Old England', or something like that 🤔.

After googling, edited to add - it was 'Old Chester' - s-l300.jpg

Remember the launch of that 'premium of all lagers' ........................... Grunhalle - I AM being sarcastic 😜 .  The older barmaids REALLY thought it was a 'german word' - till I pointed out to them that it was meant to be 'Greenhall's' in German 😅😂🤣!

Edited by Olliebeak
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15 minutes ago, Olliebeak said:

They also did a bottle of 'strong, dark ale' similar to a Barley Wine - might have been called 'Old England', or something like that 🤔.

Old Chester?

 

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Brought up on the smells of-

1.Greenalls brewery.2.Beechams Germaline.3.Pimbletts bakery znd if anyone can remember The Glue Factory in Jackson st..didn't they have specific dayss when the smells were prevalent?.

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I remember the old fella's getting half of mild in a pint glass and a bottle of that Bull's Eye Brown to top it up with. 

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A pint of Brown Mixed

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Ollie the Royal Oak was a Greenall's pub back then but its now called The Bird Game.

 

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Festival was on draught also, there was another bottle called Family Ale  if memory serves...

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I used to like Walkers Falstaff in the winter and preferred Burtenwood to Greenalls

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Festival was Greenalls answer to Double Diamond - bit on the sweet side for me. It was 2/4d a pint when we first started serving it when I worked at the Huntsman Haydock. Some of the older mild drinkers would finish off their evening with a Chester/mild. When I started in 1968, Mild was 1/7d and bitter 1/8d in the bar - 1d extra in the 'best side'. The only lager we sold then was bottled Tuborg - 2 or 3 bottles a week.

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51 minutes ago, HORT said:

Royal Oak was a Greenall's pub back then but its now called The Bird Game.

 

Thought it was changed back to the Royal Oak, years ago, and it was Game Bird as in ones you shoot at.

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Its The Game Bird now and Bird Game is what you play in it.

 

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Must have changed back again then, i remember when it was first "done up" being a bit shocked at all the lovely wooden panelling being ripped out. suppose that was nearly 40 years ago!

Edited by Tony J
typo
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Forgot this one

 

CzVC9Li.jpg

 

 
Edited by HORT
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The strength was never shown on the label / pump clip as it is now. Is there any reference to that ?

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I think that that only came in during the late 1980's.

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18 hours ago, NSSO said:

Brought up on the smells of-

1.Greenalls brewery.2.Beechams Germaline.3.Pimbletts bakery znd if anyone can remember The Glue Factory in Jackson st.

Given the industries of the town, it’s hardly surprising that an abiding memory of those days is of an assortment of smells, good and bad. I’ll try to strike a fair balance.

Some of the smells we lived with still come to mind. Probably the worst of these was the hydrogen sulphide (rotten eggs) stench from the Sidac cellophane factory that we passed on the bus on the way to our paternal grand parents in Sutton. Just as the bus approached Sutton, on the left-hand side, was a sort of small multi-coloured lagoon with an equally multi-hued stream flowing into it. Heaven alone knows what chemicals it contained but, boy, did it stink!

Equally nauseous pongs came from the gasworks and all the Producer Gas plants that fuelled the glass factories. There was one stream that ran through Parr that was little more than an open sewer and was fondly known as The Stinking Brook.

Other less offensive smells that were an everyday part of life in St Helens were the smell of hops and malted barley from the Greenall and Whitley Brewery in Hall Street, the sweet herbal cinnamon smell from Beecham’s pharmaceutical works near the town-centre and the smell of yeast from a yeast wholesaler in Dentons Green Lane.

I can clearly remember a strong smell of mothballs or naphtha at the northwest end of St Helens. I think it came from the newly developing Kirkby Industrial Estate but I’m unable to pinpoint its original source

Another smell that stays in my memory is the smell of coffee being ground and smoked bacon at Horace Cole’s up-market grocery store almost next door to Mrs McCulley’s sweetshop at the Lingholme Corner. (He later opened another in Greenfield Road that his new wife managed).

A very distinctive smell of that era was in the three main hospitals; the Providence behind the Theatre Royal, Whiston near Rainhill and the St Helens Hospital on Peasley Cross Lane. No matter when you visited or which area or ward you entered, they were all defined by the pervasively sweet smell of chloroform.

Then there was the “Sallywhite” bleach mixing works in Albion Street close to Boundary Road. The precise location escapes me but the strong acrid smell of the chlorine bleach lingers on in my mind.

The nicest smells from childhood include the privet blossom on the overgrown bushes in Queens Recreation Park, lilac blossom from gardens in Dentons Green Lane and the Lily of the Valley and Dorothy Perkins roses in Grandma Grundy’s back yard. And of course there were also the enticing smells from the town’s many bakeries, including notably for us, Skellands at the bottom of Boundary Road and Bowleys just around the corner in Duke Street.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Alan
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2 hours ago, Alan said:

the smell of coffee being ground and smoked bacon at Horace Cole’s up-market grocery store almost next door to Mrs McCulley’s sweetshop at the Lingholme Corner. (He later opened another in Greenfield Road that his new wife managed).

I remember that smell well although I don't remember his having a shop at the Lingholme - I used to be sent to Greenfield Road (from Dilloway Street) as quite a young boy - especially for some corner gammon "sliced on number 10"! The finest thing from Skellands was a meat pie (although you took a gamble on how much pepper it contained) but pork pies had to come from Jackies, a few doors down from Mr Cole in Greenfield Road while Bowleys victoria sponge cakes were also a joy. Wonderful memories from 65 years ago! 

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As opposed to the earlier quotation which was from my book on St Helens published 5 or 6 years ago, the following reference to the smells of St Helens is from a book that I've yet to get published:

(Strange thing about the bus journey (No. 6 Trolley bus to St Helens Junction) is that I can still vividly remember the smells that permeated the cigarette smoke-laden air on the upper deck.  In fact I’m sure that in those days you could navigate the route by smell alone. As the bus made its way up Duke Street you got the warm comforting smell of Bowley’s bakery on your right closely followed by the cooked meat smell of Whittle’s pie shop on the left. When you turned into Baldwin Street you caught the herbal smell of Beecham’s Pill factory off to your right in Westfield Street. Progressing along Church Street, you got the smell of hops from Greenhall and Whitley brewery to your left. Next up was the more unpleasant smell of coal gas and tar from the Gas Works at Peasley Cross and the producer-gas from the UGB works behind it. Then as you passed the two hospitals, you got the traditional hospital whiff of disinfectant and chloroform. The real winner was however after you’d turned left into Robins Lane when you hit the unspeakable rotten egg smell of the Sidac Works. If you survived that pong which seemed to originate from a small multi-coloured pool fed by an equally multi-coloured stream that in my child’s mind’s eye came from the bowels of the factory, you were almost home and dry with just the welcoming smells of Royle’s Bakery awaiting as you closed in on your destination. If you were lucky, the destination would be marked by the hot oil and smoke smell of a steam-engine at the Junction Station.)

Edited by Alan
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Brings back many memories. I worked at Greenall's for 8 weeks in the summer of 1968.

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Did you ever go down to the Tudor Bar?

 

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For me the most evocative sense is smell. Alan's reference to the Rec's privet blossom is so nostalgic. Even now if I get a wiff of privet it takes me back.

Edited by Bert
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Don't recall oatmeal stout but another was Red Rose Stout..... It's all coming flooding back now "Bull Bitter" because the draught bitter was not always consistent. You used to get a funny look from the landlord if you asked for one in a Tetley / Walker pub.

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Edited by HORT

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