Jump to content
Mark Haselden

Where was Canal Side, Newton-le-Willows?

Recommended Posts

I'm trying to plot all my family associations with the Sankey Canal.  One of my relatives lived at Canal Side, Newton-le-Willows in 1861.  I can't find any such location in the 1848 map of the area. 

Does anyone know where Canal Side might be, other than a generic location close to the Sankey?  I'm wondering if it was close to either Newton Common Lock or Bradlegh Lock?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Did your relation work at the Sankey Sugar Works?  Have found a site that lists most of the workers from 1855 to 1911 and where they lived. As well as Vitriol square there are two rows of cottages called Sankey Cottages.  The sugar works and employees houses are near Bradley lock.  There is also a James Monks living at Lock House on the 1861 census. There is a helpful map on the page, it is colour coded to show what properties existed in 1861 through to 1901. 1861 is green.  Hope you find what you are looking for.   Here is the link http://home.clara.net/mawer/loc-earles.html

           
Edited by Phoebe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

P.S. On the list of workers there is a Thomas Haselden(e), clerk,, living on Vitriol Square in 1891, aged 39. By 1891 he is living in Larkfield House close to the sugar works, so he must have been held in quite high esteem. Also a William Haselden, age 40, mechanic, living at Lower Astley, Vitriol Square in 1911 and Alfred Hazeldine, 18, packer, living at18 Prince(s) Street in 1911. It isn't labelled on the coloured map on the link which is in the top right hand corner of the page, but I think it is in the area  at the east end of Earle Street where there is a cluster of red squares. There is a Princes Street which still exists on modern maps.

           
         

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Phoebe,

Many thanks for all that info.  I definitely need to trace those Haselden names to see if they're related to me.  Those picks of the Vitriol works are really excellent.

I was interested in the Canal Side location in case it was associated with any of the Sankey Canal locks.  Several of my family were lock keepers but they are sometimes listed as labourers which can make it hard to be sure that they were associated with the Sankey Canal.

Cheers,

Mark

  • Thanks (+1) 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are welcome Mark.  I enjoyed looking at the sites myself as I was brought up in Newton-le-Willows. Hope you have some success.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had a quick look for  James Monks thinking he may have been the lock keeper at Bradley Lock 1861.  He is a labourer at the sugar works but he is lodging with Piers and Sarah Hagleden at Lock House. Piers is a 'lock keeper land'.  Possible that his surname has been transcribed wrongly amd could be Hasleden?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Phoebe,

Yes, Piers Haselden is my Great x4 Uncle.  His surname is mis-spelled as Hazleden in the Census then further mistranscribed as Hazleden.  It's a pretty common problem with my surname.

I'm trying to track down where Pier's nephew, William Haselden, lived in 1861.  It's just listed as Canal Side, Newton.  In 1857 he was a Canal labourer at Carr Mill.  By 1871 he was at Winwick Lock and 3 years later was a Canal Banks Man at Winwick Quay.  It's not clear whether he was the Lock Keeper in 1871.

I'm guessing William was still a labourer working on the canal banks in 1861 but it would be nice to pinpoint where he lived at that time.

  • Like (+1) 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mark,

Have you come across this site before, it photographs the route of the Sankey Canal as it was in 2014. I don't think it will help your search, but there are some great images, including the filled in Winwick Lock.  It starts at Spike Island, Widnes Dock, and goes all the way to St.Helens.  I have looked into this area as my husband's great grandparents x 2 lived by Widnes Docks around 1860.http://ourlocalvoice.co.uk/sankey-canal-in-2014-and-the-future

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Phoebe.  Yes, I've seen this photos before.  In fact, we were in St.Helens a week ago and visited the Old and New Double Locks as well as the Bradley (or Bradlegh) Lock.  The latter 2 locations were well maintained but the New Double Locks is a real mess and in desperate need of a clean-up.

Interesting that you have relatives who were at Widnes Dock.  Piers Haselden, who later was the Lock Keeper at Bradley Lock, is listed as working at Widnes Dock in the 1841 and 1851 Censuses.  One of maternal Great-Great Grandmothers also listed Widnes Dock as her residence on her marriage certificate of 1851.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We think my husband's  great x 2 grandfather, Patrick Devine, came over from Ireland during the potato famine. Our brick wall is knowing which part of Ireland he came from. There is a Patrick in Warrington on the 1851 census and it looks as if he may have married in the area.  The first accurate information we have is his second son's birth record in Runcorn in 1855. The next three sons are born in Widnes between 1856 and 1860. We have the birth certificate of Michael born 1860, and place of birth says Widnes Dock, so presumably that is where they had been living since 1856. Many of my husband's relatives worked in the chemical industry over here.We haven't visited the area, I expect you are familiar with this sitehttp://www.disused-stations.org.uk/features/widnes_dock_and_marsh/index.shtml       

"The area around Widnes Dock had developed with industry from 1847 when John Hutchinson opened a chemical works alongside the canal. The works was served by both the canal and the railway. Further factories opened up within twenty years and the town of Widnes began to develop. To the north of the dock and the sidings at the point where the railway crossed the canal by means of a swing bridge a small settlement developed which by the 1840s included houses a pub, a chapel and a school. The settlement was known as the Widnes Dock township.'"   By 1881 the family had moved to Penn Street in Widnes. Interesting to think members of your family may have met members of my husbands.

By 1907 the family had moved to St.Helens to work in the glass industry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.