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gilly

Your teachers,can you name 'em?Are they still with us?

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Same age as myself now, in fact, so not very young at all! He was quite young for a headmaster in 1965, though, I think. Maybe his bad attitude stemmed from a feeling of having to prove himself. Mr McLoughlin has just been mentioned in another thread, and I'm glad to hear he's in good form. I don't remember a teacher called Thornitt at all. Our English teacher at one time was Ned Biggs, who was a great country dancing enthusiast. He was impossible to get angry. He used to just shame you into behaving and getting some work done. A really nice chap. I was speaking to his daughter a while ago, and I'm sorry to say he's no longer with us.

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Same age as myself now, in fact, so not very young at all! He was quite young for a headmaster in 1965, though, I think. Maybe his bad attitude stemmed from a feeling of having to prove himself. Mr McLoughlin has just been mentioned in another thread, and I'm glad to hear he's in good form. I don't remember a teacher called Thornitt at all. Our English teacher at one time was Ned Biggs, who was a great country dancing enthusiast. He was impossible to get angry. He used to just shame you into behaving and getting some work done. A really nice chap. I was speaking to his daughter a while ago, and I'm sorry to say he's no longer with us.

 

Eddie must have started teaching there after you left , I am about 6 years behind. you are right about Bro Leonard though, he had a dreadful attitude, but that was by far surpassed by Bro Ambrose who was one of the most objectionable people I have ever met.

 

Ned Biggs' son was in my brother's class and I seem to remember Joe Coan's children going to Windleshaw so he must have married a catholic.

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Hi Griffin have sent you a pm on behalf of Kev.

Back to the thread. He is very pleased that some of you on here have reinforced what he has been telling me for years about his days at WP, which I have to say, seemed a bit strict to say the least.

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West Park (the old school) was very old-fashioned, and a bit daunting when I first saw it. The prefects seemed very remote and dignified. The Head Prefect was a chap called Ken Onions. I think he was able to administer the cane in certain cases, although that may be a false memory. There was a thing called the Prefects' Committee which you could be summoned before. We had a system of house points called Stars and Stripes. You got a quarter star (a little slip of paper) for good work, which you put into a box in the corridor. Each full star was entered against your name on a list above the box. At the end of the year, it was announced which house had gained the most stars. Stripes were for bad conduct, and were quite rarely awarded. I think this system survived into the new school, but wasn't taken as seriously. In the new school, there was a different atmosphere, and everything was more relaxed.

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Griff - just remembered Dickie Boardman the art teacher- nice easy going bloke - came from Ashton I believe. One Saturday he had Arthur Dooley ( famous scouse artist at the time ) painting in the art room. I think it was organised by the history teacher ( another scouser whose name escapes me ) who was also an excellent artist - he used to visit and paint scenes of Liverpool docks. Did you mention Mr Fehan the chemistry teacher - always good for a laugh.

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I'd forgotten Bill Fehan. A very amiable chap. The history teacher was Frank Hendry. He was something of a local historian and occasionally broadcast on the BBC. I have a tape recording of him somewhere. We never had any formal sex education in those days, but I remember that, a few days before we left, Dickie Boardman gave us a bit of a talk on the subject. It was excruciatingly embarrassing, for both parties, I suspect.

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I know Billy Bold is no longer with us, but unsure about anybody else mentioned.

Gerry Platt, Physics.

Billy Bold was famous at my gran's house. He was a good mate of my Uncle Billy who was also a teacher. He was my gran's personal benchmark for scruffiness. "Come here Alan and let me get that hole patched, yer fevver Billy Bold"

 

Gerry Platt rings a bell. Did he live in Swinburn Road?

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To be honest, I don't know where Gerry Platt lived. I suspect that, if he'd lived in Swinburne Road, I'd have known, because my great-aunt lived there, and we spent quite a bit of time at her house helping with gardening and so on. Also, I walked down Swinburne Road to school each morning, so I'd have been bound to see him. Ma and Pa O'Reilly did live in Swinburne Road, though. I sometimes got a lift from them in their two-tone green Vauxhall Cresta.

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How different peoples perceptions of teachers are. I left Grange Park the year before Hort started. The only teacher I had problems with was Mr Watts (Maths) He hated me for a while and would not mention my name when giving out homework books, for about a 2 a week period, he would throw my book on the floor at the other side of the classroom. He left for a year and he came back as my form master. He immidiately made me form vice captain. No vote was teken just Alan Austin form captain and me vice, go figure!! He is no longer with us.

All the rest I like some more than others of course.

Mr Crawshaw, history. Mr Green Geography who left in the middle of my last year (thrown out I think, he knew his subject but could not teach.

Mr Llewellyn, games, boys of course but he was my form master. Loved him

Mr Stringer, Mr Webster, science, he was abit hard with his punishment, but liked him anyway.

Miss Critchley sport, very good followed by Miss Raspin, nice lady but could not control many of the girls. Miss Hughes, Biology another nice person who had difficulty with control of the class.

Mr Frodsham Math. he thumped me in the back every Monday morning,not sure why, but I liked him as he knew I was useless at Math but left me alone to muddle my way through, which was good as I was a lost cause by then.

Miss Harrison needlewrok a bit odd. Miss Crompton and Miss Jennings, music.. I liked them. Miss Jennings did art also (I did not) Mr Hazeldon was OK for German lessons but I was a failure again.

Head master, Mr Walker and vice head was Miss Stone, both quite strict but very fair.

All in all I loved my school days at GP, just wish I would have made more use of them.

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Sacred Heart Juniors 62 - 65.

 

Sam Holland. Miss McManus Mr Woodhead.Joe Gaskell. Mrs Gallagher- (I think she was related to Miss Gallagher at St.Patricks).Miss Vincent.

And one teacher whos name escapes me, but was memorable for telling everyone to "Get those shoes off my furniture"!

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Math. he thumped me in the back every Monday morning,not sure why, but I liked him as he knew I was useless at Math

 

What the hell is Math?

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I'd forgotten Bill Fehan. A very amiable chap. The history teacher was Frank Hendry. He was something of a local historian and occasionally broadcast on the BBC. I have a tape recording of him somewhere. We never had any formal sex education in those days, but I remember that, a few days before we left, Dickie Boardman gave us a bit of a talk on the subject. It was excruciatingly embarrassing, for both parties, I suspect.

 

Billy Fehan lived in Crosby and used to bring tap water in from home for experiments as it was not hard like St Helens water. I think he died years ago in his forties as did Ken O Brien.

 

We had the sex talk too, the teachers must have drawn straws to do it I think, am struggling to remember who did ours, think it might have been Bro Nicholas(aka scab on account of his dreadful acne) The lad sat behind me fainted!

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Greenbanker,it was Miss Agnes Gallagher at Sacred Heart and Miss Mary Gallagher at St.Patricks,they were sisters and lived in Boundary Road,Agnes owned a Ford car and would drop her sister off at St Patricks every morning.

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I'd forgotten Bill Fehan. A very amiable chap. The history teacher was Frank Hendry. He was something of a local historian and occasionally broadcast on the BBC. I have a tape recording of him somewhere. We never had any formal sex education in those days, but I remember that, a few days before we left, Dickie Boardman gave us a bit of a talk on the subject. It was excruciatingly embarrassing, for both parties, I suspect.

 

 

 

but we had plenty of informal sex education with the girls from notre dame ohyeah.gifohyeah.gifohyeah.gifohyeah.gif

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Wishful thinking, methinks. The nuns had them well under control. I'm reliably informed that they were forbidden to go within six feet of the brook on their side.

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Greenbanker,it was Miss Agnes Gallagher at Sacred Heart and Miss Mary Gallagher at St.Patricks,they were sisters and lived in Boundary Road,Agnes owned a Ford car and would drop her sister off at St Patricks every morning.

Thanks Tessmop. Just remembered it was Mrs Bailey who was so protective of her furniture.

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I think they did, though. This is the Catholic Church in the sixties we're talking about. Unlike today, we had priests, nuns, teachers, parents, police, neighbours, strangers even, and society in general, hammering the message home that there was a certain way to behave. If you put a foot out of line, any adult was likely to tell you off. As for matters of morality, the notion of a conscience, eternal life and divine judgment, and the knowledge that you would be going to confession on Saturday, rather militated against any sort of free and easy lifestyle. At least that's how it was among the educated, respectable lower middle class. I obviously can't speak for any other segment of society. I've no doubt there were girls who were strangers to conventional respectability, but I'm not sure they were the sort of girls with whom I'd like to have been seen.

 

Would any Notre Dame Old Girls like to comment?

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When you get to my age the schools are no longer still

with us never mind the teachers.( Nutgrove infants and Grange Park )

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I REMEMBER A FEW TEACHERS FROM HIGHER GRADE MR FINCH MR TAYLOR MR VAULKMAN MR WHITLEY KEN ?[CHEMESTRY] HEAD MR INGHAM AND BEN ?WHO LEFT TO TAKE OVER THE FOOD OFFICE AT WINDLE PILKINGTON SCHOOL

Edited by jeb

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Math. he thumped me in the back every Monday morning,not sure why, but I liked him as he knew I was useless at Math

 

What the hell is Math?

 

When we was at school it was always SUMS and we could work it out in our head, not like today with calculators etc. God help you if they saw you counting on your fingers noway.gif

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Bridger

.. and if you took your shoes and socks off as well -------- DUCK :)

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Sacred Heart Juniors 62 - 65.

 

Sam Holland. Miss McManus Mr Woodhead.Joe Gaskell. Mrs Gallagher- (I think she was related to Miss Gallagher at St.Patricks).Miss Vincent.

And one teacher whos name escapes me, but was memorable for telling everyone to "Get those shoes off my furniture"!

 

I was at Sacred Heart Juniors 53 - 56 and the one name that I remember was Mr. Liptrott

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Griffin - you're dead on about control - I'm a Notre Dame old girl even if just the junior school but the same held for my high school too. Closest I got to hanky panky was a kiss in a bus stop (one of those enclosed ones you can't see into) in Parr, and my mum STILL knew about it before I got home.

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I was once walking past the Congregational Church with a couple of other boys. We must have been about nine or so, and we were being a bit boisterous. It was Saturday (we were probably going to the Savoy), and none of us was wearing any sort of school uniform or tie. A WPC approached us, and said that if we didn't behave ourselves, she would tell Mr McManus, our headmaster at Windleshaw. How on earth did she know which school we went to? Did she have a religious radar built in, or was it just a good guess? If so, she should have been promoted to CID.

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