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Things you don't see anymore


Alan
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Posted (edited)

I used to darn my own as my mother died when I was nine. Being inventive I used a large torch-head asa darning mushroom - switching it on if I wasn't sure where the next thread should be

Edited by Alan
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My Dad had a lot of "Lasts", he used to repair all our families shoes, I didn't bring those to the US though, they would have been too heavy in my suitcase. :lol:

2x old Antique Cast Iron Cobblers Shoe Lasts last Ideal Door Stops /FREE  POSTAGE | eBay

 

 

Edited by Phyll
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Shops that sold the leather to repair the soles and heels on the shoes when using a last. Also the black or brown wax that was heated and then painted over to cover the edge. I remember a shop in the covered market selling all the products; was it called Clare’s? All the workers there had extra large thumb nails and they weren’t blind.

Edited by Brianza
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For some reason those 'Lasts' the shoe repairmen used fascinated me. I used to take Grandfathers shoes to be 'soled and and heeled' or to have metal tips put on the soles. The shop (in a shed off Scholes Lane) had a number of lasts the repair man used and I'd find the three legs fascinating. I bought one from a car boot sale once and kept it for years. A memory jerker!

Edited by kizzy
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Still got my dad's old last - use it as a door stop. I remember him using it to put new clog irons on when he worked down the pit. He used to get them from our local cobblers - Jack Duddle's in Clipsley Lane.

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Other than politicians and TV presenters, men wearing neatly knotted ties with their shirt's top button properly fastened

Cravats

Jackets with leather elbow patches

Women in seamed stockings

Stray dogs on the street

Three-wheeler cars

Parcels wrapped in brown paper and string

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  • 2 months later...

Kids playing conkers

Private bathrooms at public swimming pools for those with no home bathroom

Home-made catapults, bows and arrows and laccy guns


added 56 minutes later
1 hour ago, Alan said:

Private bathrooms at public swimming pools

Just remembered, they were referred to at Boundary Road swimming pool as Slipper Baths. We didn't have a bathroom in our house in Harris Street until about 1960 so we used them every week

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Another memory of the Boundary Road slipper baths is that as you entered the cubicle the attendant handed you a heavy brass key thing that you used to turn the taps on. His instruction was to lob it over the wall of the cubicle once you'd filled your bath so he could collect it and hand it to the next customer

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  • 2 weeks later...

Did anyone jump off the balcony into the swimming pool at Boundary Road baths? The swimmers that did it were grabbed by the attendants and thrown out for the day. For some reason it was always a challenge and a tick in the bucket list having done it.

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I never had the courage but I do remember others doing it. I also remember lads peeing from up there onto those below.

On a related subject, do you remember us all having our swimming trunks (cossies) tightly rapped up in the towel and looking like a swiss-roll with a jammy centre?

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Brianza, no I didn't. At Loughborough College the brave and deranged jumped from a similar balcony into the shallow end of their pool. Do you remember the shallow entry method when doing you bronze survival certificate? The student had another shallow entry method involving being in a tucked position, elbows in, hand pressed against your face, hitting the water on your front. Madness!

Back to Boundary Road. Risky mixed bathing twice a week, Wednesdays and Thursdays. One of the balconies was curtained for modesty or was it to prevent young perverts trying to look over the doors of the changing cubicles opposite?

Edited by Bert
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Boundary road baths!!!mmm.

Remember THE LOUD VOICE of the bath superintendent.

Remember the various extra activities when Boards were put over the pool.

Remember the various swimming sports days .

Remember going on a Sunday morning to sweat off the night before.

BUT REALLY MUST NOT FORGET.

1.CROSSING ROAD FOR PIES AND DOORSTOPS.

OR

2.GOING UP TO SHOP ON CORNER BOUNDARY ROAD AND KIRKLAND ST FOR SARSPARILLA.

There was a contributor  on this site a bit back who was the son of the owner.

I wonder if we hadnt had a policy of bathrooms for all would we still go daily for a BATH.

The bath supers house on the corner of the building.

 


added 7 minutes later

BERT.Loughboriugh College.

I know Alan was at Cowley .

I am sure he would remember the prefects.Quite a lot ended up going to do sport at Loughborough.Was that e Rite of Passage to end up as a teacher---- Compulsory College scarf, kipper tie, accompanied stupid style shirts, trousers and shoes.

Did they promote OU or go on as well on BBC2 when they left Loughborough.

They seemed to be the "experts" of the day back then.

I wonder what the old stagers of the teaching profession thought of them. 

.

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We used to go to Boundary Rd. Baths once a week with the school.

I hated the smell of Chlorine that always hurt my eyes & that stuff we had to walk through before you went in the pool & I never did learn to swim very well. :no:

But I loved going to the shop opposite for hot chocolate/drinks & snacks. :thumb:

The old Boundary Road Baths | St helens town, St helens, Local attractions

 

Edited by Phyll
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Dex, I only spent a week at Loughborough as part of the ASA Swimming Coaches Course but I remember being told then that this method of entry was known as the kamikaze method and practiced by students completing their swimming teacher's exam. 

Phyll, re. the smell of chlorine. Back in those days the policy for swimming pools was minimum chlorination. Eyes sting and the pool smells when there is too little chlorine in the pool; most people think it is because there is too much. Chlorine kills bacteria within a few seconds, it then becomes a secondary form of chlorine which is still active in killing bacteria but takes longer. The chlorine then becomes a trichlorine which gives off a gas and that's what you can smell. Ideally the water should contain, (parts per million), 2:1 fresh chlorine to secondary chlorine. The Boundary Road pools would have had chlorinated water coming in at the shallow end but by the time it was leaving the chlorine would have become a trichlorine especially after a lot of us had been in.

From your photos Hort the building isn't the same. Is there still a ladies and a gentleman's pool and what size are they? 

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Most of St Helens kids learned to swim in these baths, it was a right of passage. I did aged about 7 when we used to go every chance we could during the school holidays. I remember rounding up friends to go with and borrowing swimsuits/caps. We'd walk there and back to spend our bus fare in the hovis shop.


added 18 minutes later

One main pool Bert, and it stands in the footprint of the original even though the whole place has been rebuilt. There is a small pool for toddlers (or there was last time I was in there a few years back).

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