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Alan

Strange St Helens words

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Ah slutch a mixture of good old mud and water,great stuff when you're young!

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Amorites. My mum used the word often and I always thought she meant 'am I right'. Meaning not knowing what she was doing. Like I was annoying her so much she didn't know what she was doing.

Joyce

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Sort of like Amarites and Amawrongs? :P

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I once said to an American woman in a shop in Arlington Texas that I was chuffed with my purchase, my exact words was "I am dead chuft with it".

She couldn't get over this word "Chuft", she found it so endearing.

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they're referred as 'candlesticks'

That takes me back Ollie, I can see them hanging down now, and how with a quick sniff they would disappear back up the nostrils, ad infinitum.

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Yeah, I remember amarites. My dad used to say, "mind your mum, she's in her amarites" ("am I right or am I right", meaning she was never wrong. )

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My parents used it in a totally different context as in "I'm in me Amorites this morning" meaning that "I'm not quite all there" or in another similar expression "corn't gerrout o' me own road",

 

I always assumed that the origin was something to do with the Amorites of Biblical times. A wandering tribe of Babylon. See http://www.ancient.eu.com/amorite/

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Has anyone heard this old St. Helens saying before: 'What's thee agait sorra'?

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My grandmother always said " agait " when describing a persons actions ie she's agait or He's agait

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Who remembers Fannyfannakapan and Tittyfolloll?

my mam used these two expressions regularlyWe are talking 1930's onward
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1940s, my granddad always called me Mickey Drippin. What was that all about?

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Wasn't there a Lizzie Dripping?

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Thas not gorra big yed. goan get 10 lbs or spuds in thee cap

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Childer,,(children),,Owduzeeno,,,(how does he know)

Childer related to the Nordic Kinder.

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Childer is old English I think and said throughout the north

being in your Amorites means not being quite with it as I remember

what about the things you pick out of your nose = Crows

and the soft shoes you played in at school = galoshes or gollies

These last 2 only in St helens as far as I am aware are they still used

what about "toss tail over" is that from st helens?

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the soft shoes you played in at school = galoshes or gollies
We called em gollolls. A gollie was a globule of spit, a green gollie was the same but indicated that you'd got a nasal or chest infection. A brown gollie was an inevitable consequence of either smoking or St Helens chronic air pollution

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Bortered meaning you were covered in something like dirt or paint.

 

Me dad use to take his snap to work or pack lunch as we know it.

 

Me mam use to say "They should have been smothercated at birth" when talking about someone she didn't like. It was years after when my sister informed me that it wasn't a real word but suffercate and smothered joined into one word.

 

Me mam use to say "They should have been smothercated at birth" when talking about someone she didn't like. It was years after when my sister informed me that it wasn't a real word but suffercate and smothered joined into one word.

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If we were moving something big and heavy like a wardrobe, the standard expression for shuffling it round one end at a time was "daddying" it, in our house at least. I wonder where that came from?

 

Never heard that one before - I've always used 'shuftying' :dunno:!

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Anyone heard "Smarmy"? it was suppose to identify someone with a "I am far better looking than you attitude".

 

I once recall a lad when I was 17 in Chezzies and he spent most of the night fixing his hair in the mirror in the best side.. I recall hearing he got kicked to fk LOL

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We didn't use 'smarmy' in quite the same way, Pete.

 

We used it to describe somebody who thought they were better than somebody else in every way - not just looks. ie - cleverer; better off; having better clothes; having a better job; even thinking they were 'harder'. I think 'self-satisfied' or 'smug' is the word I'm looking for smile.png.

 

 

The other way it was used was when somebody was being very insincere - like showing sympathy over something, when they didn't really mean it.

Edited by Olliebeak

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We didn't use 'smarmy' in quite the same way, Pete.

 

We used it to describe somebody who thought they were better than somebody else in every way - not just looks. ie - cleverer; better off; having better clothes; having a better job; even thinking they were 'harder'. I think 'self-satisfied' or 'smug' is the word I'm looking for :).

 

 

The other way it was used was when somebody was being very insincere - like showing sympathy over something, when they didn't really mean it.

 

Does anyone remember mud being called sloppydutch when they were a kid or was it just me :dunno:

yes I remember than well
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