Jump to content

chocolate2013

Newbie+
  • Content Count

    8
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

6 Neutral

About chocolate2013

  • Rank
    Newbie
  • Birthday 11/02/1985

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  1. It's a very good point about the legal/moral side of things but I also recall something mentioned about a decision to mine the stone rather than quarry it due to the cost of purchasing the land. To me this implies that the cost of tunneling under land you don't own was considerably less (if at all) and never the less still legal and acceptable. Maybe from an access point of view it is questionable, but once further in, what would the position be then?
  2. I'm definitely thinking of going back up there soon, I reckon to get anywhere it's going to take a lot of unblocking and the majority of the blocked entrances have been collapsed on purpose and are therefore dangerous. Maybe if one of the entrances could be crawled into so far, then something along the lines of a glorified selfie stick could be used to get a view of behind it all? I wouldn't recommend anyone crawling through as it stands though, it would have to be made structurally safe first by a professional.
  3. Hmm, there are areas which may slightly resemble alters, the first and possibly easiest to get to is inside and to the far right of the main caves. This is what came to mind when I watched the myths and legends of Merseyside years ago. There are what you could call steps at the furthest point leading to a ledge around to the left side along the top. At one point here there appears to be an entrance but if memory serves me correctly it was just the shape of the rock going into a slight alcove. Shortly after dropping through the overhang through the gated mousey, there is another area quite similar but much smaller, this seems to be supported by a large wooden beam going the width of the cave. It also has what might look like steps at the far end. In my opinion, these caves and tunnels went much much further, I couldn't see somebody blocking/dynamiting an entrance which only lead to another 20 ft of tunnel. With regards to a stream, the tunnel which once led from the collapsed mousey probably crossed a stream from what people seem to recall, which would explain the running water sound further in and after lowering off. Where this comes from or goes is anybody's guess. There is also an area of the gated mousey, just before going around the circular tunnel where water has accumulated, nothing seems to be feeding this though. Sorry if this is a little confusing. looking at the map I put on of the main caves, this is the area to the far left, but it's upside down. This is my understanding of where the stream would be. After entering the collapsed mousey (top right of this diagram), you would then travel down the passage 30ft until you reach a slit in the ground (first arrow from the top), after dropping down you would travel a possible 300m as somebody estimated to a second slit in the ground (second arrow from the top), after dropping through here the tunnel widens until you come to a stream going the width of the cave (4ft deep and 6ft wide), from here the tunnel could be easily crawled down until you reach a brick/dry stone wall (running 12 ft across the width of the tunnel, some remember this as being partly collapsed), after this you would travel downhill until you reach a circular room with a hole in the floor, a metal bar was supposedly laid across this hole for lowering off (third arrow from the top), after dropping down, the tunnel continues but narrows until sounds of running water can be heard. Obviously this isn't to scale and there may be more detail missed out but from piecing together peoples directions etc it shouldn't be far wrong. I'm sure I read on here maybe that one of the farmers told somebody it had been blocked in the 1970s due to there being an artesian well down there. Now the furthest I believe is accessible is the first arrow from the top. Thinking about it now, wouldn't that stream be around the same area underground as the stream separating the fields runs over ground? Just a thought as the tunnel seems to go in that direction
  4. I'm still trying to picture this ledge which people are talking about being at field level, it's mentioned on a few forums as being at that height, built into the cliff/rock face and more towards the main caves. Could it be that there's an area now overgrown or concealed somehow leading behind most of the blocked entrances? Or it could be the one 2/3 of the way up the bank slightly to the left of the gated mousey, if so that's a s**t load of digging
  5. Ha thanks all, I know they aren't magnificent but I tried to include most of the detail. I am planning to do a bit of unblocking sometime soon, maybe try to get a few people interested in helping to get it done faster ;-)
  6. Sorry, I know these are only basic but they show the entrance to the main caves and the gated mousey, green areas are rock/ground etc, yellow areas are higher ground, orange areas are lower down and the areas highlighted pink were once entrances/tunnels which lead further in but are now either fully or partly blocked. People seem to call several crawl spaces 'the mousey', so for the sake of simplicity I usually call the one in the ditch the 'gated mousey', the one which was further up the hill and to the left of this the 'blocked mousey' (many people will remember these two entrances joining up either along the first tunnel or just after dropping down through the overhang) and the one to the left of the main caves the collapsed mousey because at one time (many moons ago) it could be walked through but the mouth of the cave collapsed leaving the 2ft hole we see now. As far as getting further is concerned, some of these pink areas require only for rocks to be moved (a lot of them though), however most are collapsed as the result of explosives. The man from the council, Harold Green or 'H' as he is usually called is responsible for the numerous gates and locks which are to protect endangered bats and to protect people from possible accidents. The collapsed mousey is arguably the most simple (but not easy) to unblock, by moving rocks. This is the tunnel where people will remember going past a stream and lowering off just after a broken wall to an area with sounds of running water.This was also used in the video on the Myths and Legends of Merseyside as far as I can tell. The roadway which was towards the right of the main caves (Inside) straight to the back and then left has long ago been collapsed as this led far. The only slight possible access is via a twisting tunnel to the right of the blockage which either goes straight ahead or drops to the right, only to join up and continue back underneath yourself. this is extremely dangerous in my opinion as no matter how far you squeeze through, you can't get far enough to access the road way which is at least 5 meters behind at a guess and it's very unstable. The raised chamber inside the gated mousey is probably the only way forwards now, however I have personally dubbed this blockage the 'bitch in the ditch' as it's the most unsafe, unsecure, unstable, remote part of that cavern in my opinion, but one which is potentially blocking a much deeper set of caves and tunnels. Also, access to the roadway and tunnels beyond is still possible from 'secure location' from what I have read somewhere. Sorry for taking up so much space guys, I know the pics aren't the best but I had to take a photo of a photo do upload them :-/
  7. Hmm I tried the 'more reply options' and still no attachment symbol/option came up, just the same reply window but at the top of the page :-/
  8. Hello everyone, I have been going to (and into) the Crank Caverns for what must be years now. I would like to upload some photos and a basic map of the accessible caves and tunnels as they look now. Can anyone tell me how :-/ I clicked the 'image' button but it asks me to enter URL. can't I just copy and paste or something?
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.