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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/11/18 in Posts

  1. 8 points
    Ted and Volunteers have now completes the memorial, shown below with soldiers added.
  2. 4 points
    Here are the arrangements for this years Ceremony of Remembrance:-On the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month in the year 1918, the nation of Germany signed an armistice agreement, prepared by Britain and France, which declared the end of the First World War.After four years' fighting, and the deaths of millions, St Helens will come together 100 years on to the day, to commemorate the fallen at Remembrance Sunday ceremonies across the borough.The events will, of course, also be an opportunity to honour those who died during all conflicts of the 20th and 21st centuries.As in previous years, residents are invited to congregate at Victoria Square on Sunday 11 November at 10.25am, where a parade - led by Armed Forces veterans and young representatives from the Cadets, Scouts and Guides - will make its way from Birchley Street to the war memorial in front of St Helens Town Hall.The ceremony will open with a welcome and prayers from local parish reverends before the square observes a two-minute silence at 11:00am.After the two-minute silence, the ceremony will continue with words of commemoration; a rendition of ‘Amazing Grace’ by a lone piper; and a performance by the Haydock Male Voice Choir. The ceremony will close with the National Anthem, led by the Valley Brass Band and Haydock Male Voice Choir, before the laying of wreathes.Following the service, the town hall will be open for tea and coffee where there will also be the opportunity to view a local World War One photo exhibition, courtesy of the St Helens Community Archive.In Earlestown and Newton-le-Willows the focal point will be the war memorial at Earlestown Town Hall, with the event due to get underway at 10:45am. St Helens North MP Conor McGinn and Deputy Mayor of St Helens, Janet Johnson, are among those due to attend.The A57 Warrington Road, from View Road to St James Road, will be closed for Rainhill’s procession from St Ann’s Church for a wreath laying ceremony at 12:00pm.Remembrance services will also take in churches and at war memorials in several of the borough’s other wards, including Rainford and Billinge.Meanwhile, as part of the St Helens 150 events programme, St Helens will participate in a national tribute event that evening.The ‘Beacons of Light’ tribute will see a gas fuelled beacon lit at Taylor Park to symbolise the ‘light of hope’ that emerged from the darkness of war.The ceremony will get underway at 6:45pm, with those interested in attending asked to meet at the Boathouse Café at 6:30pm. The beacon will be lit at approximately 7:00pm.In St Helens Town Hall the evening before (Saturday 10 November), the Haydock Male Voice Choir will perform a special 'Bless 'Em All' concert to mark the centenary of the armistice.The lovely and talented Ellie Hull will sing Vera Lynn numbers and there will be a chance for audience participation.The Royal British Legion and army and navy cadets will join in for a 'Last Night of the Proms' type grand finale.St Helens Council’s Armed Forces Champion, Councillor Lynn Clarke said: “Remembrance Sunday is a fitting opportunity for us to honour our servicemen and women who gave the ultimate sacrifice for their country – and this year we are proud to be playing a part in the historic international event, ‘The Beacons of Light’ to recognise the contribution and sacrifice made by the men and women from our own community.“Each year, it’s moving to see such incredible turn outs at Remembrance Sunday events, with young and old coming together to pay their respects which is a heart-warming reminder that St Helens will always remember.”
  3. 4 points
    True, everyone focuses on those "famous" battles and tend to forget or never knew about the massive battles in March, April and May were the Germans threw every thing they had in a final attempt to win the war and Haig's famous "to the last man" order which our 55th West Lancashire division followed to the letter at Givenchy, infantry, engineers, orderlies, cooks, in fact anyone that could carry a rifle did!. Then the "last hundred days" were the allies ( now including America) threw everything they had at the Germans to finally break their resolve. It took everything, even though Germany was on it's knees, their troops did not give ground without a massive fight. An oft forgotten about period but hugely important, it goes without saying.
  4. 4 points
    It is astonishing to think that in terms of the actual casualties in WW1 (On all sides) 1918 was the most appalling year of all. This is astounding when you think of what had happened on the Somme in 1916 and then at Passchendaele in 1917......but its True.
  5. 4 points
    Thousands there last night for a 20 min display that started at 7:30pm. Taken manual mode,fast shutter. Spark in the park 2018 by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Spark in the park 2018 by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Spark in the park 2018 by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Spark in the park 2018 by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Spark in the park 2018 by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Spark in the park 2018 by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Spark in the park 2018 by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Spark in the park 2018 by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Spark in the park 2018 by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Spark in the park 2018 by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Spark in the park 2018 by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Spark in the park 2018 by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Spark in the park 2018 by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Spark in the park 2018 by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Spark in the park 2018 by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Spark in the park 2018 by Robbob 2010, on Flickr
  6. 3 points
    We've almost entered the last week of the centenary of WW1. In the last month, up until and after the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, the losses of St Helens people had continued. Look at that last month - the last four noted as being 'Killed in Action' being John Harrison, Willie Arthur Johnson, John Lowcock and Henry Warren on the 8th of November, but people were dying every day from wounds received and from the flu pandemic, amongst other diseases. It was a hell of a miserable month. And as our calendar shows, if you click through the following months, it was far from over, continuing into the 1920s - and beyond (e.g. my grandfather died in 1943, during WW2, as a result of mustard gas and of TB and the malaria he'd contracted in service in WW1). People sometimes ask how many St Helens people died, but we can only give a rough estimate that is based on the number of entries on the site - during those war years and a few years later. It was many more than are listed on the cenotaph. That rough estimate is 3,537. We will remember them.
  7. 3 points
    I think it looks a lovely building. Warrington Town Hall by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Warrington Town Hall by Robbob 2010, on Flickr I popped up Warrington Town Hall by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Warrington Town Hall by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Warrington Town Hall by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Warrington Town Hall by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Warrington Town Hall by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Warrington Town Hall by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Warrington Town Hall by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Warrington Town Hall by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Warrington Town Hall by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Warrington Town Hall by Robbob 2010, on Flickr
  8. 3 points
    That's Brilliant Ted, thanks to everyone who has been involved with the restoration work - great job!
  9. 3 points
    Cheshire Police would like to interview the occupants of two Ford Transit crewcab pickups that were seen parked nearby around the time the gates went missing.
  10. 3 points
    I hated every minute of school except the day we left.
  11. 2 points
    There's also a beacon being lit on Billinge Hill 7pm i was told.
  12. 2 points
    Seems a bit dear to me, but they are lovely gates. This was interesting.
  13. 2 points
    Fantastic Ted,hope you get the award.
  14. 2 points
    Work done for remembrance so far.
  15. 1 point
  16. 1 point
    Military records free from today until 12 November
  17. 1 point
    Well that's what i read on the sister site 'Warrington Guardians' website,they have gone in for restoration. I spoke to a guy outside the Town Hall and he said that they are due back early next year. I wonder who's paying for that. Golden Gates in Warrington gone for restoration. by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Golden Gates in Warrington gone for restoration. by Robbob 2010, on Flickr Golden Gates in Warrington gone for restoration. by Robbob 2010, on Flickr https://www.warringtonguardian.co.uk/news/16955745.video-golden-gates-being-removed-as-500k-repair-job-starts/ Some more pics to follow.
  18. 1 point
    A bit more done today (100) and more to come.
  19. 1 point
    Nearly finished by Ned and his volunteers.
  20. 1 point
    Not while I was there Ollie. Left in 1969.
  21. 1 point
    Just read it then Ned,good luck i hope you get it. Your up against a Connect member too. Handepay Unsung Hero Award - Claire Rigby - Teresa Farrimond - Ted Forsyth
  22. 1 point
    Yes. I remember the Beesleys very well. The dad had two curly-coated retrievers and he was a cycling enthusiast. John Beesley attended Knowsley Road school and Cowley and we were close friends throughout. He now lives in Knowsley Road close to where Saints ground used to be and prior to that lived at the town end of Lingholm Road. We still correspond every year
  23. 1 point
    I still believe that it is 1906. The 1858 Crash states that the station masters house was cut in two...…………..it is hardly damaged on that picture. The clothing looks correct for the turn of the century and the quality of the image, its sharpness from both angles looks not like a photograph from 1858. The Train Carriage itself also does not look like it is from the earlier period.
  24. 1 point
    The photo is not of of a train but a carriage. So it seems strange how one carriage could become detached from a train and derail and crash. Very strange.
  25. 1 point
    If you got the image from Sutton Beauty site I know it says the incident was 1906 but look at this report from same page, surely there can't have been two similar accidents? Although it was noted for its misadventures. There is no entry there for 1906. 6th September 1858 - Two engines (named Hero & Goliath) collided on the Parr Colliery branch line which led to the Hero crashing into the stationmaster's house at St.Helens Junction while he was in bed, cutting it in two. The stationmaster's family were uninjured but a 14-year-old lad named Charles Whittaker, who was clinging to the engine, was 'frightfully mangled' and killed.
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