Jump to content
HORT

Teachers's Rest

Recommended Posts

When I went to school in the 1950s and 1960s, we had Summer Holidays of 5 or six weeks off as they do now.

Then in October we had another holiday from school that all kids and parents called "Teacher's Rest".

It was 6 weeks after the end of the Summer Holiday and about 6 weeks before the Christmas Holiday

Now its called Autumn Half Term. Is this political madness gone mad?

Does anyone else remember it being called "Teacher's Rest"?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

'Teacher's Rest, Mother's Pest and Father's Aggravation' was what we always knew it as, HORT :rolleyes: !

  • Haha (+1) 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was called spud-picking holiday in the early 1950s. We used to cycle up to that farm that was next to the Smithy at junction of Kiln Lane and Bleak Hill Road and be taken on a trailer by tractor to fields for a couple of days back-breaking labour

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can remember my Grandmother doing pea picking with my Mum's younger sister and brother back in the late 40's and early 50's,I think that was a farm in Rainford ,not sure which one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went spud-picking at Sammy Strettle's farm in Rainhill in the 50's. Great memories of hot sunny days running free through the fields and lanes and a severe case of belly-ache at the end of each day. We'd get picked up on a flatbed pulled by a tractor down the narrow lanes and most days went home penniless because we just played instead of working. Happy days though :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We were each given a piece of sacking which we tied around our waists with a length of baler twine. The whole thing was referred to a a brat. We were each assigned an area of ground and as the tractor with the plough went round it'd unearth the spuds in each allotted area. We then loaded them into our brats until we could hardly move and then staggered over to a hamper and tipped them into that. Wages were ten bob a day paid daily. At the end of each day we all lined up in the farmyard and the farmer appeared with a wad of ten-bob notes and gave one to each of us. Happy days

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How could I have forgotten the sacking! Mam and the other pickers used to tie theres' round their waist but we kids weren't considered 'proper pickers' so didn't need them. I was given directions to the farm in Rainhill a while ago by one of our members (Vinty) and I had a drive up there last year. I recognised immediately where the tractor used to turn into the field to drop us off over 50 years later. It's still a working farm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×