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MogsXX

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About MogsXX

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  1. Aircraft Recognition

    vinty and Phyll My thanks for your replies. I have read the links and the subject is well covered. I remember it well. The only part I felt was missing was that the aircraft was caught in the beams of at least three searchlights when I recognised it and the Ack Ack guns started blazing away. I always thought it was shot down by them. I was also one of the school boys that went out to view the crash the following day and it seemed to me just as though the aircraft had done a belly landing as it was mainly in one piece. It must have been carted away probably why the site has never been found over the years? MogsXX
  2. The only aircraft I saw shot down during the war was a Bolton Paul Defiant a British night fighter. I was 12 at the time when it was caught in the searchlights over Rainhill I recognized it but that did not stop the Anti Aircraft guns opening up on it and it went down some where near Rainhill railway lines. Friendly fire they call it nowadays!!! Did anyone else see it come down? MoggsXX
  3. Wonderful work. Well done to all concerned. I hope we will not forget these brave men MogsXX
  4. The Grange Park Hotel

    How about that? I married the Landlords daughter Ernest and Anne Critchley. We met there in 1957 and when Ernest moved to the Bottle and Glass we were married from there The Grange was a lovely building. The staircase in the lounge bar was a masterpiece of Victorian craftsmanship what a great shame if it was destroyed? The billiard room was a joy and Ernie's beer was the best in town!!!!! MoggsXX
  5. Old St Helens sayings

    My young friends used to shout.......RLCC......RLCC........RLCC meaning "run lads coppers coming"
  6. king kenny Thank you king so it looks as though 58/61 is the answer to my question as to when the tramway might have been removed. Just a bit puzzled about the building in Moss Lane is that near the Rugby Club or am I way out? Moggsxx
  7. firemansam Thanks for your info. My wife's father kept the Bottle and Glass and we well remember your Uncles having the odd tipple in the bar. The Hill Top farm was kept by the Houghtons and I also remember shooting rabbits with both sets of farmers in the 50's but I cannot remember the buckets crossing the bypass for the life of me. One thing I can remember was that during the war the bypass became an Ordnance Depot of sorts with loads of army vehicles parked down one side. As Army Cadets we were treated to the odd ride in armoured cars up and down the bypass as fast as they could go....loads of fun then! MogsXX
  8. Phyll You are a star, thank you! On the old map that I looked at they are marked as a "tramway" which runs from the Potteries down Mill Lane passed the site of the old Steam Corn Mill across Berringtons Lane where there seems to have been a level crossing gate and then passed Foot of the Hill Farm up to the the Hill Top Pipe Works and Clay Pits. Looking at old aerial photos it would appear as if bogies ran on the lines? Perhaps the tracks were removed when the Bypass was built? Hort No I don't remember it? Just going off what I can see on an old 1928 Map MogsXX
  9. Can anyone remember the tram way which extended from Rainford Potteries up along Mill Lane to the clay pits behind the Bottle and Glass. They may well have also been used by Pilkington's Rainford Sand Wash Works I think Mill Lane gets it's name from the Rainford Steam Corn Mill which was near Mill Lane Bridge Just wondering when they were removed? MogsXX
  10. Good words that have disappeared

    Having been called Moggie most of my life.....it is obviously a nickname....quess what? MogsXX
  11. Chicken Runs

    Thanks Le200 Never heard of the Mashers Song but it will be of interest when it turns up.....I wonder if Chris ever looks at this site as perhaps my thread does in someway connect to his item? MogsXX
  12. Chicken Runs

    jinx They were always called "chicken runs" by my folks. My father in law born 1905 met his bride at the Toll Bar Taylor Park gate when he was 21 and when she, just a bit younger, was parading with her girl friends. I suppose back in those days it was a good way for young people to eye one another up? Anyhow he died age 98 after she passed away a few months before age 94 so they always had happy memories of "chicken runs". I believe St Helens wasn't the only Lancashire town to have these favourite Sunday walks. MogsXX
  13. Chicken Runs

    Phyll They were an ongoing events usually every Sunday evening from Spring to Autumn certainly before and after WW2 when I was a boy. But I would think historically this type of "promenading" had been going on for ages with everyone showing off their Sunday "best"? Perhaps the introduction of tv killed them off? Enjoy the holiday. MogsXX
  14. Chicken Runs

    It would not suprise me if this topic has been aired before but as a relative newcomer on the site here goes. As youngster one of our favorite Sunday evening occupations was to go to one of the "Chicken Runs" in the town. Either the one from Toll Bar to the Bird 'ith Hand or the one down town along Church Street. They seemed to start about 6pm and depending on the weather ended about 8pm. Large groups of folk from every age group would promenade backwards and forwards along the pavement chatting, greeting friends making new ones and generally enjoying an evening walk, hundreds of people used to turn out on a summer evening. It was such an happy, funfilled pastime I should not think it could happen now? Does anyone out there remember those innocent days MogsXX
  15. WW1 soldier

    Ratty You probably know: The 5th Reserve Battalion came into being in the Spring of 1915.Its early days were spent in billets at Southport. It moved at the end of 1915 to Codford in Wilts and then to Witley in Surrey in Spring 1916. After a few weeks near Oswestry, it went back to Southport again in the Autumn 1916. It moved to Ripon in January 1917 and then to the race-course at Scarborough in April 1917. It remained there until the end of the war. MogsXX
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